I had high expectations with Edward Dmytryk’s The Caine Mutiny in terms of special effects and action sequences, and even though those expectations were not met, I saw something more worthy of mulling about - a stellar performance from good ol’ Bogey. Humphrey Bogart made a smooth transition from his suave romantic leading man persona to an insane aging ship captain. I never saw a performance of his that was so filled of hate, confusion, and inner anguish, and Bogart unleashed all of those “pecularities” as if he was keeping it all to himself since his Hollywood debut in the 1930s. Bogart’s performance was aptly supported by strong performances from Jose Ferrér and Van Johnson -  in a role that cut him free from his matinee idol stature in Golden Age Hollywood. Moreover, for a 1954 film, the sound recording in this film was quite ahead of its time.
HIGHLIGHTS: Queeg (Bogart) defends his sanity in the court; One of the greatest monologues ever delivered in cinema. That scene where Queeg stares into nothingness while his ship was teetering was an excellent one, too.
DOWNSIDE: None
RATING: 8 out of 10

I had high expectations with Edward Dmytryk’s The Caine Mutiny in terms of special effects and action sequences, and even though those expectations were not met, I saw something more worthy of mulling about - a stellar performance from good ol’ Bogey. Humphrey Bogart made a smooth transition from his suave romantic leading man persona to an insane aging ship captain. I never saw a performance of his that was so filled of hate, confusion, and inner anguish, and Bogart unleashed all of those “pecularities” as if he was keeping it all to himself since his Hollywood debut in the 1930s. Bogart’s performance was aptly supported by strong performances from Jose Ferrér and Van Johnson -  in a role that cut him free from his matinee idol stature in Golden Age Hollywood. Moreover, for a 1954 film, the sound recording in this film was quite ahead of its time.

HIGHLIGHTS: Queeg (Bogart) defends his sanity in the court; One of the greatest monologues ever delivered in cinema. That scene where Queeg stares into nothingness while his ship was teetering was an excellent one, too.

DOWNSIDE: None

RATING: 8 out of 10

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Posted on Monday, 19 March
Tagged as: the caine mutiny humphrey bogart van johnson jose ferrer fred macmurray robert francis 1954 film review edward dmytryk
  1. jamietalon posted this